Perspective

Creating the Illusion of Depth

In this chapter, we talked all about representing space and depth on a 2d plane. We talked about things like size variation, overlap, and perspective. In terms of perspective we talked about 1, 2, 3, and multiple point perspective. This is using one or more vanishing points to serve as guides to simulate 3d space.

 In this chapter, we talked all about representing space and depth on a 2d plane. We talked about things like size variation, overlap, and perspective. In terms of perspective we talked about 1, 2, 3, and multiple point perspective. This is using one or more vanishing points to serve as guides to simulate 3d space. 

Wes Anderson

If any of you are familiar with the director Wes Anderson, you probably have noticed that he has a very distinct visual style. One of the unique characteristics that I just started noticing recently is that just about all of his shots are done in one-point perspective. This means that if you were to draw lines along all the streets, buildings, and rooms, they will all lead to a single vanishing point. A possible reason for this technique could be to simulate the feeling of seeing a play on stage, where the audience is facing the scene directly and never moving or turning to odd angles.

Here is an example of some of his shots:

Drawing Perspective

Here is a wonderfully explained and condensed history of the development of linear perspective.

In this session, I would like us to not only learn about perspective and how it is used, but to produce it yourself. To learn how to do it, I have provided some video tutorials for one, two, and three-point persepctive. It seem intimidating at first, but after just an hour of practice, you should become fairly comfortable with it.

Please follow along with each of these videos and for your homework, create your own 1, 2, and 3-point perspective drawings. Details about the homework are below the video examples.

1-point perspective

2-point perspective:

3-point perspective

HOMEWORK

For your homework, I would like you to draw three scenes - one using 1-point perspective, one using 2-point perspective, and one using 3-point perspective. Your scene can be of anything: a cityscape, a still life, a room. Please use a straight-edge to create your perspective lines and erase them afterwards so that only the 3d objects remain. Please draw each scene on its own 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper (or larger if you would like).

Questions?

As always, please email me if you have any questions! jearley1@ivytech.edu